Share |

Content about Behavior

July 25, 2014

What do you want from your job? The answer may illuminate the source of your motivation--or demotivation.

What do you want from your job? The answer may illuminate the source of your motivation--or demotivation.
 
June 15, 2014
Awareness of individual strengths and weaknesses is a first step toward developing team strategies for more handling inevitable conflicts. By effectively managing conflict we can tap conflict to energize ourselves and others in constructive directions.

KADENA AIR FORCE BASE, OKINAWA -- Members of the Pacific Air Force Civil Engineering Squadron on Kadena Air Base joined Dr. Brent Duncan to discuss building high performace teams in challenging environments. Key topics included:

March 5, 2014

You may find that some bosses tend to propose as their own your ideas that they rejected last week. It goes back to the old adage that the best way to persuade others is to let them think it was their idea in the first place. If it's the idea and not the credit that is important to you, you might be able to leverage this often predictable phenomena to allow someone with authority push your ideas that he rejected last week.

MARCH 03, 2014, KADENA AIR FORCE BASE, OKINAWA--Dr. Brent Duncan conducted a persuasion skills workshop for the 18th Force Support Squadron Maintenance Support Group today. As part of the 18th MXG Leadership Pathways series, the workshop titled

"Winning people over to your ideas" focused on the following objectives:

March 1, 2014

What do you want from your job? The answer may illuminate the source of your motivation--or demotivation.

What do you want from your job? The answer may illuminate the source of your motivation--or demotivation.
 
September 24, 2013

Exploring strategies for building and leading high performance teams in resource-restricted environments.

June 4, 2011

Part 1 of "Perspectives in human development" considers the mechanistic philosophy, which explores questions about what makes people the way they are (Goldhaber, 2000). Those who see through the mechanistic lens see humans as machines (Pepper, 1970) that passively react to internal and external forces over which they have no control (Goldhaber, 2000). Literally, Hunt and Ellis (2004) describe mechanism as "the physics of motion or the study of mechanics", that describes how parts of a system work together to produce phenomena (p. 23). This leads to the assumption that that universal laws of nature govern all natural events, including human development and behavior.  In other words, "We can't help ourselves, it's just the way we are."

Competing "isms" of human development

May 17, 2011

Neuroscience is demonstrating that theorists like Freud, Piaget, and Erikson were wrong when they concluded that adulthood marked the end of development and the beginning of decline to death. To the contrary, emerging discoveries are showing how adulthood is a time of new possibility with immense potential to nurture.

May 17, 2011

Presentation given at the Misawa International Education Conference. Addresses the following questions: What are the threats and opportunities for adult development in the emerging economy? How does brain development create personal growth opportunities throughout life? How can being aware of developing brain function and capacity help individuals manage personal development, health, and performance?
 

Presentation given at the Misawa International Education Conference. Addresses the following questions:

April 21, 2011

In this excerpt from Dynamic Interactive Adaptability in a Killer Disease: How shifting your perspective on stress promotes growth, resilience, and wellness, Brent Duncan presents a functional model for tapping daily stress as a productive force, for building resilience against severe stressors, growing through traumatic stress, adapting continuously to and with a dynamic environment, and enhancing wellness.

January 17, 2011

The truths in the field of social psychology seem as disparate as those that drive countless ideological perspectives in the traditional realm. This creates a discipline for which “There are almost as many definitions of social psychology as there are social psychologists” (Aronson, 1972,  p. 4). To the outsider, the field of social psychology may seem to be little more than people with competing perspectives applying fancy words to truths that have been known throughout history. 

January 14, 2011

Regardless of his pioneering role in revolutionizing psychology in the second half of the 20th century, Abraham Maslow seems to have become a regular target of both criticism and disregard in academic and scientific circles. This rejection invites inquiry into why controversy surrounds one man's vision for a psychology to help people grow toward and transcend "full humanness". This paper reviews Maslow's needs theory against modern perceptions and criticisms, discovers a seeming disconnect between Maslow and his interpreters, and proposes a new perspective on Maslow that might align textbooks with Maslow's intent so researchers can attempt to measure a holistic dynamic process rather than a rigid and fallacious metaphor.

-----