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August 25, 2014

The experience and wisdom of the ages remains influential in popular dialogues and literature, and provides scholars with a rich resource of concepts to test through research. 

July 25, 2014

What do you want from your job? The answer may illuminate the source of your motivation--or demotivation.

What do you want from your job? The answer may illuminate the source of your motivation--or demotivation.
 
March 5, 2014

You may find that some bosses tend to propose as their own your ideas that they rejected last week. It goes back to the old adage that the best way to persuade others is to let them think it was their idea in the first place. If it's the idea and not the credit that is important to you, you might be able to leverage this often predictable phenomena to allow someone with authority push your ideas that he rejected last week.

MARCH 03, 2014, KADENA AIR FORCE BASE, OKINAWA--Dr. Brent Duncan conducted a persuasion skills workshop for the 18th Force Support Squadron Maintenance Support Group today. As part of the 18th MXG Leadership Pathways series, the workshop titled

"Winning people over to your ideas" focused on the following objectives:

March 1, 2014

What do you want from your job? The answer may illuminate the source of your motivation--or demotivation.

What do you want from your job? The answer may illuminate the source of your motivation--or demotivation.
 
February 9, 2014
"Think outside the box" is not only an incredibly uncreative way to say "be creative", those who chant this mantra usually have no idea what the box looks like. 
 
Now research is showing that the think-outside-the-box cliché is "dangerous" and "flawed" myth. The "new" discovery that made it's way to Psychology Today comes straight from the old, and should sound familiar to my students:
 
Learn the proven fundamentals well enough to creatively apply them in dynamically changing context.
"Think outside the box" is not only an incredibly uncreative way to say "be creative", those who chant this trite mantra usually have no idea what the box looks like. 
 
August 23, 2011

Decades of research into student attrition offers a bevy of conflicting causes and cures for dropouts. However, the consistent factor most research identifies as a key antecedent to student persistence is faculty.

Considering the faculty connection to student persistence, the University of Phoenix College of Undergraduate Business and Management (UBAM or college) conducted internal research to determine best practices for fostering adult-student goal commitment at its San Francisco Bay Area campus. This paper reviews key lessons and limitations the current attrition literature offers for meeting student persistence initiatives in adult higher education environments, summarizes results from focus group research into best practices for helping adult students to achieve academic goals, and proposes research projects for discovering antecedents to adult-student persistence.

Decades   of research into student attrition offers a bevy of conflicting causes and cures for dropouts. However, the consistent factor most research identifies as a key antecedent to student persistence is faculty.

June 4, 2011

Part 1 of "Perspectives in human development" considers the mechanistic philosophy, which explores questions about what makes people the way they are (Goldhaber, 2000). Those who see through the mechanistic lens see humans as machines (Pepper, 1970) that passively react to internal and external forces over which they have no control (Goldhaber, 2000). Literally, Hunt and Ellis (2004) describe mechanism as "the physics of motion or the study of mechanics", that describes how parts of a system work together to produce phenomena (p. 23). This leads to the assumption that that universal laws of nature govern all natural events, including human development and behavior.  In other words, "We can't help ourselves, it's just the way we are."

Competing "isms" of human development

May 27, 2011

High atop a bluff, Brent Duncan and his wife Penny watched as the Pacific Ocean overpowered the shoreline and blanketed communities along the northeastern coast of Japan. As surge after surge of water rushed inland, Duncan, a lead faculty member with University of Phoenix, knew the low-lying areas would be badly damaged. When the devastating earthquake and resulting tsunami finally ran their course, hundreds of miles of Japan’s coastline lay devastated and tens of thousands of people were dead or missing...

Faculty Matters Magazine published an article (Summer, 2011) about recovery and relief operations following the 2011 Great Northeastern Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. Following is an excerpt from "Japan's unprecedented disaster" by Carlye Dash (2011):

April 29, 2011

Summary

 

April 24, 2011

The media is starting to recognize the emerging phase of the disaster that struck Japan on March 11, 2011: survivor suicide. The question becomes, what can we do, if anything, to stop the survivor-suicide phase of disaster? A key part of the challenge is to influence change using existing practice and infrastructure within the established culture. That means teaching locals how to administer to one another, not imposing programs, practice, and morals as outsiders. 

Some Japanese friends told us a story that is making the rounds through the grapevine about a Fukushima farmer who killed himself when he learned that he had to destroy his crop of radioactive cabbage. This grapevine story appeared in the Los Angeles Times today in a story titled "Japan fears post-quake rise in suicides."

January 14, 2011

Regardless of his pioneering role in revolutionizing psychology in the second half of the 20th century, Abraham Maslow seems to have become a regular target of both criticism and disregard in academic and scientific circles. This rejection invites inquiry into why controversy surrounds one man's vision for a psychology to help people grow toward and transcend "full humanness". This paper reviews Maslow's needs theory against modern perceptions and criticisms, discovers a seeming disconnect between Maslow and his interpreters, and proposes a new perspective on Maslow that might align textbooks with Maslow's intent so researchers can attempt to measure a holistic dynamic process rather than a rigid and fallacious metaphor.

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