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Content about Human development

September 24, 2013

Exploring strategies for building and leading high performance teams in resource-restricted environments.

January 30, 2013

OKINAWA, KADENA AFB, JANUARY 22, 2013 -- As part of the Kadena Air Base Medical Group Professional Development Series, Brent Duncan conducted a workshop on leading individual and organizational change in turbulent environments, and methods for fostering adaptability to enhance human performance and wellness in changing environments. 

 

November 5, 2012

 

OKINAWA, KADENA AFB, NOVEMBER 05, 2012 -- As part of the Kadena Air Base Professional Military Education program, Brent Duncan met with airmen on November 5, 2012 to discuss strategies for leading change in dynamic environments, and methods for fostering adaptability to enhance human performance and wellness in changing environments. 

 

July 18, 2011

Despite living in a society that holds cooperation as a core value, students in the Japanese higher education system typically study in a rigid lecture-test environment that neither supports nor condones collaboration in the classroom. I addressed this cultural cognitive dissonance during a lecture to Hachinohe University faculty about how to use group-learning methods to invigorate student development in traditional higher education.

This article provides the English and Japanese language resources from "Transforming the traditional classroom with team learning: The teacher’s shifting leadership role in collaborative learning environments," a lecture presented by Brent Duncan to the faculty and adminstration of Hachinohe University, Japan on July 13, 2011.

July 16, 2011

Although academic and leadership literature tends to use “team” and “group” synonymously to describe a group of two or more interacting people, proponents of work teams and learning teams generally recognize important differences between groups and teams that can influence how leaders design, implement, and interact with teams. Distinguishing between a team and a group can help teachers to understand the proper leadership for the context.

June 4, 2011

Part 1 of "Perspectives in human development" considers the mechanistic philosophy, which explores questions about what makes people the way they are (Goldhaber, 2000). Those who see through the mechanistic lens see humans as machines (Pepper, 1970) that passively react to internal and external forces over which they have no control (Goldhaber, 2000). Literally, Hunt and Ellis (2004) describe mechanism as "the physics of motion or the study of mechanics", that describes how parts of a system work together to produce phenomena (p. 23). This leads to the assumption that that universal laws of nature govern all natural events, including human development and behavior.  In other words, "We can't help ourselves, it's just the way we are."

Competing "isms" of human development

May 17, 2011

Neuroscience is demonstrating that theorists like Freud, Piaget, and Erikson were wrong when they concluded that adulthood marked the end of development and the beginning of decline to death. To the contrary, emerging discoveries are showing how adulthood is a time of new possibility with immense potential to nurture.

May 17, 2011

Presentation given at the Misawa International Education Conference. Addresses the following questions: What are the threats and opportunities for adult development in the emerging economy? How does brain development create personal growth opportunities throughout life? How can being aware of developing brain function and capacity help individuals manage personal development, health, and performance?
 

Presentation given at the Misawa International Education Conference. Addresses the following questions:

January 14, 2011

Regardless of his pioneering role in revolutionizing psychology in the second half of the 20th century, Abraham Maslow seems to have become a regular target of both criticism and disregard in academic and scientific circles. This rejection invites inquiry into why controversy surrounds one man's vision for a psychology to help people grow toward and transcend "full humanness". This paper reviews Maslow's needs theory against modern perceptions and criticisms, discovers a seeming disconnect between Maslow and his interpreters, and proposes a new perspective on Maslow that might align textbooks with Maslow's intent so researchers can attempt to measure a holistic dynamic process rather than a rigid and fallacious metaphor.

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