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Content about Organizational Behavior

June 15, 2014
Awareness of individual strengths and weaknesses is a first step toward developing team strategies for more handling inevitable conflicts. By effectively managing conflict we can tap conflict to energize ourselves and others in constructive directions.

KADENA AIR FORCE BASE, OKINAWA -- Members of the Pacific Air Force Civil Engineering Squadron on Kadena Air Base joined Dr. Brent Duncan to discuss building high performace teams in challenging environments. Key topics included:

September 24, 2013

Exploring strategies for building and leading high performance teams in resource-restricted environments.

March 9, 2013

Despite a culture with cooperation as a core value, Japanese higher education generally uses rigid lecture-test teaching models that neither support nor condone small-group learning methods in the classroom. As a result, Japanese college students usually work outside the classroom to develop the collaborative skills necessary to contribute effectively at work and in society.To assess the viability of team learning methods foreign to Japanese higher education, a mixed methods action study project was conducted with remedial students in a Japanese college. 

Despite a culture with cooperation as a core value, Japanese higher education generally uses rigid lecture-test teaching models that neither support nor condone small-group learning methods in the classroom. As a result, Japanese college students usually work outside the classroom to develop the collaborative skills necessary to contribute effectively at work and in society.

January 30, 2013

OKINAWA, KADENA AFB, JANUARY 22, 2013 -- As part of the Kadena Air Base Medical Group Professional Development Series, Brent Duncan conducted a workshop on leading individual and organizational change in turbulent environments, and methods for fostering adaptability to enhance human performance and wellness in changing environments. 

 

November 5, 2012

 

OKINAWA, KADENA AFB, NOVEMBER 05, 2012 -- As part of the Kadena Air Base Professional Military Education program, Brent Duncan met with airmen on November 5, 2012 to discuss strategies for leading change in dynamic environments, and methods for fostering adaptability to enhance human performance and wellness in changing environments. 

 

December 1, 2011

From a practical perspective, asking if an organization that fits its environment will perform better than an organization that does not seems to make as much sense as asking if an individual who is qualified for a job will perform better than a person who is not. However, in the world of organizational studies, structural contingency researchers give considerable thought to understanding the environmental factors that influence organizational effectiveness, while often failing to prove a connection between fit and performance (March & Sutton, 1997) and not adequately considering managerial choice as a factor driving organizational fit. Contingency theorists argue that an organization that adapts to its environment will perform better than an organization that does not (Donaldson, 1996) and that mismatched characteristics within organizational configurations will prevent an organization from achieving natural harmony with its environment that will lead to better performance (Mitzberg, 1981).