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Content about Prevention

May 1, 2011

Charity is not typically part of traditional Japanese culture. However, as a response to disasters like the Great Northeastern Japan Earthquake and Tsunami of 2011, thousands of Japanese are going against culture to offer selfless service for strangers. This article about a volunteer trend that has emerged from the aftermath of an unprecedented disaster suggests and important question to consider: Will tradition crush Japan's trend toward western-style charity practices or are we witnessing a major societal transformation?

Charity is not typically part of traditional Japanese culture. However, as a response to disasters like the Great Northeastern Japan Earthquake and Tsunami of 2011, thousands of Japanese are going against culture to offer selfless service for strangers. This article about a volunteer trend that has emerged from the aftermath of an unprecedented disaster suggests and important question to consider: Will tradition crush Japan's trend toward western-style charity practices or are we witnessing a major societal transformation?

April 21, 2011

On March 11, 2011, a bride met her destiny in a seaside wedding chapel high above the beach in Noda Village, Japan. Today, she awaits her groom's return.

On March 11, 2011, a bride met her destiny in a seaside wedding chapel high above the beach in Noda Village, Japan. Today, she awaits her groom's return.

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April 10, 2011

Failing to consider the loss of heritage from disaster can mean that crisis will only get worse for survivors.

April 5, 2011

A letter from Professor Michael Shackleton illuminates the urgency for life-sustaining necessities and trauma relief in disaster areas that have yet to be reached by government, military, and aid workers.

Those interested in what is happening in the areas in Japan most devastated by tsunami will find this letter to be quite interesting, if not troubling. My summary:

March 26, 2011

Airmen, Sailors, and civilians from the Misawa Air base were joined by members of the French Civil Fire Fighting Squad as Red Cross volunteers to help Japanese business owners and fishermen clear tsunami debris from their wharf and warehouses. 

Tidal waves generated by a 9.0 earthquake off the coast of northeastern Japan destroyed the Hachinohe Wharf and its fishing industry on March 11, 2011.

March 24, 2011

Before a Tsunami slammed the northeast coast of Japan on March 11, 2011, this Misawa pig farm had 2,000 pigs and four barns. After the tsunamis hit, 400 pigs and one barn remained. As part of Operation Tomodachi (friend), Airmen, Sailors, and Civilians from the Misawa Air Base volunteered through the American Red Cross to help the farmers clear the debris so they can rebuild their lives. Here are some highlights:

Before Tsunami slammed the northeast coast of Japan on March 11, 2011, the Kawazaki Pig Farm in Oirose Town had 2,000 pigs and four barns. After the tsunamis hit, 400 pigs and one barn remained. As part of Operation Tomodachi (friend), Airmen, Sailors, and Civilians from the Misawa Air Base volunteered through the American Red Cross to help the farmers clear the debris so they can rebuild their lives.

March 16, 2011

The earth's axis shifted on March 11, 2011, when an off-the-scale quake jolted Northern Japan. Seeing the event before and after it unfolds illustrates the face of a disaster; watch the bouncing X to draw the pattern. 

https://youtu.be/nwpRfB3Bslg

When the increasing intensity and frequency of earthquakes in Northern Japan started to remind me of the foreshocks of the Loma Prieta Quake that hit the Santa Cruz, CA area in 1989, I started gathering earthquake intensity data from the Japan Meteorological Agency. A few days later--March 11, 2011--the earth's axis shifted when an off-the-scale quake jolted Northern Japan.