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March 9, 2013

Despite a culture with cooperation as a core value, Japanese higher education generally uses rigid lecture-test teaching models that neither support nor condone small-group learning methods in the classroom. As a result, Japanese college students usually work outside the classroom to develop the collaborative skills necessary to contribute effectively at work and in society.To assess the viability of team learning methods foreign to Japanese higher education, a mixed methods action study project was conducted with remedial students in a Japanese college. 

Despite a culture with cooperation as a core value, Japanese higher education generally uses rigid lecture-test teaching models that neither support nor condone small-group learning methods in the classroom. As a result, Japanese college students usually work outside the classroom to develop the collaborative skills necessary to contribute effectively at work and in society.

July 20, 2011

A functionally diverse student population has joined the self-directed management-track learners who once dominated adult-oriented universities. Facing classrooms of students with a broadening range of experience, ability and motivation, how can adult educators meet the dynamic needs of individual learners? Integrating contingency leadership models with collaborative learning processes may provide a partial answer that can help adult educators to build dynamic strategies for supporting student performance, satisfaction, and persistence.

July 16, 2011

Although academic and leadership literature tends to use “team” and “group” synonymously to describe a group of two or more interacting people, proponents of work teams and learning teams generally recognize important differences between groups and teams that can influence how leaders design, implement, and interact with teams. Distinguishing between a team and a group can help teachers to understand the proper leadership for the context.

May 17, 2011

Neuroscience is demonstrating that theorists like Freud, Piaget, and Erikson were wrong when they concluded that adulthood marked the end of development and the beginning of decline to death. To the contrary, emerging discoveries are showing how adulthood is a time of new possibility with immense potential to nurture.